20.7.14

Fresh Fig Muffins with Kefir

This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias, Inc. and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone. 

moist fig muffins with kefir

Blueberry season is almost over. Pears are ripening on the trees. Right now, we have an abundance of figs on our farm. After picking figs last year, I discovered that there are not many fresh fig recipes online. Most call for dried figs. I've tried dehydrating them, but I've also had fun experimenting with new recipes. One of the few recipes I found that uses fresh figs is fig cookies. They were a hit with our family and friends. 

This year, we are recreating old favorite recipes to use fresh picked fruit as much as we can.

Inspired by our favorite fig cookie and blueberry muffin recipes, my oldest daughter helped me create these fresh fig muffins.  

how to use fresh figs

Fresh Fig Muffins

Ingredients:

4 cups flour (we use three parts whole wheat flour to one part white all purpose flour)
1 3/4 cups sugar
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon lemon peel, cardamom, cinnamon, or your favorite spice 
1 cup melted butter (add salt if using unsalted butter)
1 cup kefir  
2 eggs
2 teaspoons almond extract
4 cups diced fresh figs
1/3 cup sugar for topping

fig muffin recipe

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Stir together dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients; stir gently just until mixed. Add fruit. Scoop approximately 1/2 cup of batter into cupcake/muffin pan. Paper liners make cleanup much easier. After the first pan, my daughter remembered we had walnuts. 1/4 cup chopped walnuts was mixed into half of the batter. This recipe can easily be varied with different fruit or nuts. Be very generous with the sugar on top. It makes a crispy topping on top of a perfectly moist muffin. This recipe makes 24 large muffins. Bake 20-25 minutes until they begin to brown on top. 



muffins with jam and clotted cream

The crispy sweet topped moist muffin paired perfectly with a glass of tangy kefir. We topped them with raspberry fig jam and clotted cream. My daughter shared muffins with Grandmommie and Pappy. Everyone who has tried these has liked them. We will be repeating this recipe! We enjoyed these for Sunday morning breakfast and plan to grab them for a quick breakfast as we leave early in the morning for the girls' driver's ed class. 

Disclosure:  I am a member of the Collective Bias®  Social Fabric® Community.  This is a sponsored post for #CBias. All opinions are my own. 
Jennifer

11 comments:

  1. I adore that brand of Kefir. It's like a yummy bubbly milkshake!

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    1. Good description! Add healthy to that. I'm glad my son likes it, too.

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  2. I haven't baked with Kefir yet but I love using buttermilk or yogurt in baking so I am guessing that I will love using Kefir too! :) Your fig muffins have the perfect muffiny texture! :)

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    1. You will like baking with it. Thanks! The texture did turn out just right.

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  3. I'm excited about trying this new recipe. Pinned it for later and excited to work with Kefir. Thank you!

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  4. I bet the Kefir would add loads of flavor but do you find that baking with it kills the probiotics? I mean it would still be somewhat healthy but I would imagine you aren't getting any of the good "gut" stuff in your baked goods. Would that be the case? Curious. Those muffins look amazing!

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    Replies
    1. Good question, Penny. With a glass of kefir and a muffin the probiotics are there for sure. :)

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  5. I wonder where I can find fresh figs..... I don't tend to see them around here...

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    Replies
    1. So many recipes use dried figs. We have fig bushes on the farm, so I use what we have. Fig cookies are yummy, too. They are typically ripe in July; maybe farmer’s markets near you would have some in the summer.

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